Tips for spotting misinformation online

Tips for spotting misinformation online Last Friday marked International Fact-Checking Day — falling perhaps aptly on April 2, following the onslaught of misinformation that comes with April Fools’ Day.

In recognition of the day, Alexios Mantzarlis from the Google News Lab (and formerly of the International Fact-Checking Network, IFCN) offered up some handy tips and tricks for spotting online misinformation.

According to Mantzarlis, finding out more about the source of a piece of information can help with verification. He suggests searching for an alternative source by explicitly excluding the original web pages in order to get an unbiased opinion. 

“The [search] query would look something like this: ‘about youtube -site:youtube.com’,” he explains.

His next tip is to check whether images are being used in context by performing a reverse image search: “This will look for the picture to check if it has appeared online before, and in what context, so you can see if it has been altered from its original meaning.”

Mantzarlis further suggests looking for news coverage to see how different news outlets have reported on a topic or event, or using Google’s Fact Check Explorer to see what reputable fact checkers have had to say.
Article supplied by RMIT ABC Fact Check newsletter.

A brilliant weekly newsletter which is supported by funding from the Judith Neilson Institute for Journalism and Ideas and the International Fact-Checking Network.

First Aid Training is still operating.

West Coast First Aid Training have continued to provide training and re-qualification services throughout this uncertain period and we continue to do so.

We have had to make some changes to the way we deliver our face to face first aid training to accommodate the required public health guidelines on social distancing.
The changes we have made include, but are not limited to:

(1) We have reduced, as much as possible, the time spent in the classroom.

(2) Were possible we conduct training outside.

(3) All the required theory assessments are included in our online training, to be completed prior to attending your practical face to face assessment.

(4) We screen all students prior to attending class with non contact infrared digital thermometers. Should a student return a forehead temperature of 37.5 deg C or higher, or, should your response be yes to any of the below questions, you will not be admitted to the class and will need to reschedule your training.

The trainer will ask you the following questions on the day of training:

* Are you unwell with cold/flu-like symptoms or a high temperature? * Have you returned from any overseas travel?
* Have you had contact with a proven COVID-19 case? This includes contact with a person undergoing COVID-19 testing
All resources used during your training will be thoroughly cleaned/disinfected before, during and after each session in line with manufacturer and clinical guidelines.

Each student with be issued with their own resources and PPE necessary to complete all assessments.
 
The number of students per class has been reduced inline with available space to ensure that all participants have a minimum of four square meters to maintain physical distancing requirements.

If you have qualifications that need updating or staff that need to be trained just Click here or call 0418909935

New Medical Equipment Products Released

Coronavirus has all of us questioning if that sniffle or runny nose is something much more sinister. And with good reason.

The chart above should give you some clarity. It’s the symptoms experienced by 55,000 patients in China who tested positive for coronavirus.

The most common symptom? A fever.

The main difference between a cold and COVID-19 is the likelihood of fever: most people with COVID-19 develop a high temperature.

In contrast, while people with a cold can develop a fever, it happens only rarely, according to the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

New non contact infrared thermometer
Our new non contact infrared thermometer will help you identify at risk people.

Coronavirus symptoms have even more in common with influenza — that other, sometimes deadly virus often confused with the common cold.

So while that sniffle is probably just the usual upper respiratory tract infection, you can’t be sure. If you think you might have been exposed to COVID-19, call the Coronavirus Health Information Hotline at any time on 1800 020 080. And before visiting your GP or hospital, call ahead and call them about your symptoms.

Do you have a number of people, friends, students, associates that you need to check? – Our new non contact infrared thermometers are the answer.

Novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Information for Clients

West Coast First Aid Training (WCFAT) takes the Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) and the spreading of it very seriously. As a result we are now providing all students, on all first aid courses with their own individual resuscitation mask & first aid kit (to keep) included in the price of the course.

CPR Mask
Your own FREE face mask & first aid kit to keep when you complete a first aid course

Your own individual lung set will be supplied (to be disposed of at completion of training by you instructor). An individual manikin face will be provided per student but do need to be returned these for disinfecting and reuse. If you would like your own brand new face to keep we can provide one for $25.

Your own face to keep if you wish (add $25 AUD)

All manikins are thoroughly disinfected with alcohol and bleach prior to and during every class. Alcohol wipes and disinfection solution are available at all times during the course.

Brand new lungs for only your personal use

How can I help prevent the spread of 2019-nCoV?

• teach and encourage your children/family to wash their hands often with soap and water before and after eating as well as after attending the toilet;
• avoid contact with others by keeping children home if they are unwell;
• teaching children to cough and sneeze into their elbow; and
• while it’s not possible to avoid touching, kissing, and hugging children, parents and guardians should do their best to follow these steps too.

Where can I get more information?

Visit the Australian Government Department of Health homepage at www.health.gov.au

Call the Public Health Information Line on 1800 004 599.

Contact your state or territory public health agency:
• ACT call 02 5124 9213 during business hours or (02) 9962 4155 after hours • NSW call 1300 066 055
• NT call 08 8922 8044
• Qld call 13HEALTH (13 43 25 84)
• SA call 1300 232 272
• Tas call 1800 671 738
• Vic call 1300 651 160
• WA visit https://www.healthywa.wa.gov.au/ or call your local public health unit