Automatic External Defibrillator AED Quiz

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This is a fun and free general knowledge quiz on the operations of an automated external defibrillators.

Would you know how to use one if you needed to?

Do you need to a basic/general course on CPR & Defibrillators?

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Do Not Resuscitate tattoos – What would you do?

November 9, 2019 Uncategorized

Image: New England Journal of Medicine

I get this question a bit during my training courses and kept thinking while I would continue to resuscitate the patient, I really must look into this. No need to do that now after the great article below arrived in my inbox from the guru’s at Royal Lifesaving WA. So here is the answer to this often asked question.

What would you do if you came across an unconscious person needing CPR, but they had a tattoo that said, ‘DO NOT RESUSCITATE’? Would you ignore the tattoo and continue treatment of the casualty? Would there be any legal ramifications of ignoring the tattoo? How would you know if the tattoo genuinely represents the person’s wishes, or if it’s just a joke?

These were questions faced by a team of doctors in the US when a patient was brought into a hospital emergency department. They discovered the words ‘DO NOT RESUSCITATE’ clearly tattooed across his chest, with the ‘Not’ underlined and what they presumed was his signature tattooed underneath the statement.

Faced with the dilemma of not knowing whether the tattoo was sincere, the doctors initially decided to administer some treatment while consulting with their hospital ethics team. The ethics team reviewed the case and advised the doctors to honour the tattoo, because it was reasonable to infer that it expressed the man’s wishes.

The man later died without being resuscitated, and it was discovered that he had, in fact, completed a form expressing his wishes which were consistent with the tattoo. The case sparked international discussion around the validity of these tattoos and whether they are legally binding. 

So what would happen in Australia?

Hospitals in Australia typically don’t have an ethics team on call to review individual cases. Advance care planning does exist here; however, the laws differ between states and territories. Generally, treating doctors must be satisfied that the person was competent when they made the directive, that they understood the risks of refusing care and that it applies to the current situation – all virtually impossible for a first responder to determine when coming across an unconscious person in need of CPR.

While a Do Not Resuscitate tattoo could in fact represent a person’s wishes, without sighting documentation to verify this we cannot know for sure. Perhaps it was their wish at the time of getting the tattoo, but they have since changed their mind. Perhaps the tattoo was done in jest, or while under the influence. Additionally, the shorter version that simply states the initials ‘DNR’ presents even more ambiguity – it could stand for something else entirely. 

First responders in Australia are trained that consent is implied if a casualty is unconscious. We cannot assume to know what the person would want at the time of needing care. It is important to always follow your training and provide CPR if it is required.

Box Jellyfish

December 7, 2019 Uncategorized

A great article from National Geographic:
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/invertebrates/group/box-jellyfish/

About Box Jellyfish

The infamous box jellyfish developed its frighteningly powerful venom to instantly stun or kill prey, like fish and shrimp, so their struggle to escape wouldn’t damage its delicate tentacles.

Venom

Their venom is considered to be among the most deadly in the world, containing toxins that attack the heart, nervous system, and skin cells. It is so overpoweringly painful, human victims have been known to go into shock and drown or die of heart failure before even reaching shore. Survivors can experience considerable pain for weeks and often have significant scarring where the tentacles made contact.

Range and Appearance

Box jellies, also called sea wasps and marine stingers, live primarily in coastal waters off Northern Australia and throughout the Indo-Pacific. They are pale blue and transparent in color and get their name from the cube-like shape of their bell.

Tentacles

Up to 15 tentacles grow from each corner of the bell and can reach 10 feet in length. Each tentacle has about 5,000 stinging cells, which are triggered not by touch but by the presence of a chemical on the outer layer of its prey.

Highly-Advanced Adaptations

Box jellies are highly advanced among jellyfish. They have developed the ability to move rather than just drift, jetting at up to four knots through the water. They also have eyes grouped in clusters of six on the four sides of their bell. Each cluster includes a pair of eyes with a sophisticated lens, retina, iris and cornea, although without a central nervous system, scientists aren’t sure how they process what they see.

Client feedback

Everyone loves to read the feedback people receive just to be sure you are dealing with a person & business that can deliver the goods for your next training or PD sessions. So here are few from our latest professional development session (PD) covering Provide CPR and Provide First Aid for high school teachers.

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Hi Kevin

Thanks mate – was a great little PD. Thanks for running it, I have picked up some good context from your presentation to add to my own with the kids.

I’ll let my boss know about the upgrade costing and let you know if we will go ahead

Regards

Sam


Hi Kevin.

Thank you for getting in touch with this information. The PD was really engaging and given the current circumstances that we find ourselves in I feel that you did a top job on both the theory and practical delivery of the course. Thanks!

Hope to attend another one of your courses one day.

Cheers, Rick.


Thanks Kevin,

The course was great and entertaining!

Thank you, Dean


Hi Kev

I was at your course on Friday. in 25 years of nursing it was one of the best I have i have attended thanks

Ray Oliver


I had another teacher, Rick also comment on the program and how he was impressed by your knowledge and presentation.

Thanks again.